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TMDC WebPad

By The Macintosh Discovery Club

What is TMDC WebPad?

TMDC WebPad is a simple program which lets you store links to visit later. It supports Mac OS 8.5 features like dragging and droping URL clippings from and to the Finder. Also support are any internet protocols your computer supports from http to AIM.

How do I use TMDC WebPad?

TMDC WebPad can be used very simply. Launch the app and a plain MacOS listbox will appear. Press COMMAND - N or select File -> New link and then fill in the link field. Press Add and it is added to the listbox. Double clicking an icon will open it and do the assigned chore. This can also be achieved through the Visit link option in the File Menu.

Editing a link is easy; just select the link, press COMMAND - E or choose File -> Edit link and edit the link. Pressing Edit will save your changes.

Deleting links are also easy. Select a link and then either press Delete on your keyboard, press COMMAND - D or finally you can choose File -> Delete link.

Any more features are self explanatory and remember to check out the prefs for more options!

What's the cost?

TMDC WebPad is freeware. You may use it freely as long as you do not edit the Read Me (this doc), mess with code or resources, or alter anything in a different way. For more information, contact TMDC at admin.tmdc@worldnet.fr.

Version History:

June 14, 1999 (Version 1.1.1)

-Added 'Default Link' to prefs
-Rewrote preference code

June 8, 1999 (Version 1.1)

-Added Export feature
-Added Import feature
-Fixed a few bugs

June 4, 1999 (Version 1.01)

-Added Print list feature
-Fixed a few bugs

June 1, 1999 (Version 1.0)

-Inital release

Contact Info:

Contact us at admin.tmdc@worldnet.fr and send us ideas, suggestions, compaints, or just say hi! Also, visit our site at http://www.tmdc.org and download more of your programs.


Original file name: Read Me - converted on Wednesday, 17 November 1999, 17:22

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